Prehistoric Fiction Bibliography Creator

Thursday, June 30, 2016

New releases: The Dinosaur Knights & Hell’s Gate

Summer is here and I'm trying hard to catch up on reading, but the great outdoors keep beckoning. Now there are two new books to throw on the “to-read” pile. The first you may have heard of, the second you probably haven’t.

The Dinosaurs Knights by Victor Milán is the second in a fantasy series that Game of Thrones’ author George R.R. Martin has described as “a cross between Jurassic Park and Game of Thrones.” (A quote the publisher is touting as much as possible, as a press release it sent me attests.) I wasn’t blown away by the first book in the series, The Dinosaur Lords. That said, it did enough right that I’m willing to give the sequel a shot. The cover blurb:
Paradise is a sprawling, diverse, often cruel world.  There are humans on Paradise but dinosaurs predominate: wildlife, monsters, beasts of burden, and of war. Armored knights ride dinosaurs to battle legions of war-trained Triceratops and their upstart peasant crews.

Karyl Bogomirsky is one such knight who has chosen to rally those who seek to escape the path of war and madness. The fact that the Empire has announced a religious crusade against this peaceful kingdom, and they all are to be converted or destroyed, doesn't help him one bit.

Things really turn to mud when the dreaded Grey Angels, fabled ancient weapons of the Gods who created Paradise in the first place, come on the scene after almost a millennia.  Everyone thought that they were fables used to scare children – but they are very much real. And they have come to rid the world of sin ... including all the humans who manifest those vices.
The Dinosaur Knights comes out July 5.

The second book is something of a surprise. There is little in the cover blurb to indicate that Hell’s Gate by Bill Schutt and J.R. Finch has anything to do with prehistoric animals, but they’re central to the plot. I’m only about halfway through the novel, so I hope to have a review up in the near future. That said, I’m really enjoying myself so far. Since modern publishers are fond of describing new books as hybrids between more popular media properties, I’ll follow that trend by calling Hell’s Gate a cross between Indiana Jones and Jurassic Park. Except there are no dinosaurs. (Well, at least not yet.) Anyway, the cover blurb:
When a Japanese submarine is discovered abandoned deep in the Brazilian wilderness, a smart, adventurous, and tough zoologist must derail a catastrophic plot in Hell’s Gate.

1944. As war rages in Europe and the Pacific, Army Intel makes a shocking discovery: a 300-foot Japanese sub marooned and empty, deep in the Brazilian interior. A team of Army Rangers sent to investigate has already gone missing. Now, the military sends Captain R. J. MacCready, a quick-witted, brilliant scientific jack-of-all-trades to learn why the Japanese are there— and what they’re planning.

Parachuting deep into the heart of Central Brazil, one of the most remote regions on the planet, Mac is unexpectedly reunited with his hometown friend and fellow scientist Bob Thorne. A botanist presumed dead for years, Thorne lives peacefully with Yanni, an indigenous woman who possesses mysterious and invaluable skills. Their wisdom and expertise are nothing short of lifesaving for Mac as he sets out on a trail into the unknown.

Mac makes the arduous trek into an ancient, fog-shrouded valley hidden beneath a 2000-foot plateau, where he learns of a diabolical Axis plot to destroy the United States and its allies. But the enemy isn’t the only danger in this treacherous jungle paradise. Silently creeping from the forest, an even darker force is on the prowl, attacking at night and targeting both man and beast. Mac has to uncover the source of this emerging biological crisis and foil the enemy’s plans... but will he be in time to save humanity from itself?
Hell’s Gate is currently available in hardcover, ebook, and audiobook formats.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Remembering Cadillacs & Dinosaurs

Dinosaurs were everywhere in 1993. That was the year Jurassic Park hit theaters and smashed box office records. It also was the year two other major dinosaur films were released – Super Mario Bros.and We’re Back – although both would quickly be forgotten. Meanwhile, on television, U.S. broadcaster ABC aired the rebooted Land of the Lost. Fox Kids debuted Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, a live-action show about teenagers who fought giant monsters with robot dinosaurs. And in the same time slot on CBS, a new cartoon called Cadillacs & Dinosaurs hit airwaves. It never had a chance.

Thirteen episodes of Cadillacs & Dinosaurs aired between fall 1993 and early 1994. Based on the cult comic book series Xenozoic Tales by Mark Schultz, the cartoon was the creation of Steven E. de Souza, a screenwriter who gave us the classic action film Die Hard (and would later write and direct the not-so-classic movie adaption of Street Fighter). All kids needed to know about the show’s setting was explained in the opening credits:

“In the 26th century, mankind faces an epic struggle for survival. The forces of nature have spun wildly out of control. Mighty cities have crumbled and the dinosaurs have returned to reclaim the Earth. In this savage land, one man stands alone: Jack Tenrec. Defending humanity in world gone mad… a world where only the strong survive… a world of Cadillacs & Dinosaurs.”


Sounds awesome, doesn’t it? I certainly thought so. I was a teenager at the time, so I was outside the age range of the target audience. Still, I was a dinosaur-obsessed teen, and here was a cartoon stuffed with dinosaurs. Plus the setting fascinated me: A future post-apocalyptic Earth where dinosaurs had returned? How did the planet get that way? Why are the last humans holed up in crumbling cities? And why are they crossing the landscape in souped-up Cadillacs?

Cadillacs & Dinosaurs follows the adventures of Jack Tenrec and Hannah Dundee. Jack is part mechanic, part Greenpeace activist. His mission is to protect the environment from the same human follies that led to a global cataclysm centuries earlier. The irony is Jack goes about his work traversing the landscape in rebuilt 1950s Cadillacs, although the cars have been modified to run on clean-burning dinosaur poop. Hannah is his partner and potential love interest. She is a scientist and diplomat from a neighboring tribe of survivors. The two don’t get along at first, mostly because Jack is an annoying jerk who insults Hannah every chance he gets. By season’s end the two have developed something approaching romantic feelings for each other, although in the world of early ‘90s cartoons, knowing glances between characters were about as sexual as children’s entertainment got.

Cadillacs & Dinosaurs was much more child friendly than the comic on which it was based. (I didn’t discover the latter until years later.) Xenozoic Tales is punctuated by scenes of gory violence and has nudity and a little sex. The cartoon, on the other hand, was so committed to G-rated violence that even killing dinosaurs was off-limits. Jack was a bit of an ass in the comics, but in the cartoon he is nearly insufferable.  Hannah, unfortunately, is written for the show as something of a bubblehead. Other secondary characters underwent greater changes, perhaps the most notable being a clan of Mad Max rejects who went from being annoyances in the comics to the main antagonists of the series. (Another interesting change is that the human “moles” of Xenozoic Tales have been turned into literal mole men in the cartoon.)

Fans of Xenozoic Tales will appreciate that the cartoon loosely adapts some of the comic’s stories. The best was “Departure,” which takes Schultz’s tale about Hannah's creative solution to a mosasaur problem and expands it by throwing in a crazed warlord and a big-ass tank. The episode is easily the highlight of the series. That said, most stories were original to the cartoon, with the writers pitting Jack and Hannah against Triceratops stampedes, wildfires, and leftover weapons of mass destruction dating from before the cataclysm.

The animation was a bit stiff, being done on a TV budget, but at the same time it was rich in color with well-drawn environments and huge advancements in how dinosaurs were depicted in cartoons. The show’s greatest problem was its writing. Cadillacs & Dinosaurs suffered from bad dialogue, silly characters, and politically correct messaging that left even cranky liberals like myself wishing the writers would tone it down a little. These issues were hardly unique to Cadillacs & Dinosaurs in the world of children’s programming, but transformations were happening in television that made the cartoon something of a dinosaur. Batman: The Animated Series had debuted a year earlier, and it demonstrated that children’s shows could include complex themes and characters and still retain a younger audience (while also attracting older viewers). At the same time, a lot of kids’ entertainment was gravitating toward younger protagonists.  Gone were the days of G.I. Joeand He-Man with their mostly adult lead characters. Instead TV producers gave viewers Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtlesand Mighty Morphin Power Rangers with its “teenagers with attitude.” Jack and Hannah were practically geezers by comparison.

Still, Cadillacs & Dinosaurs had dinosaurs. It’s right there in the title, and dinosaurs were HUGE in 1993. So why did the show fail?

CBS stuck Cadillacs & Dinosaurs near the end of its Saturday morning programming block, meaning it didn’t air until 11:30 a.m. This in itself wasn’t necessarily a death sentence – Mighty Morphin Power Rangers debuted in the same time slot. But it did mean new episodes of cartoon would often be delayed so the network could instead air sports coverage at that time, particularly on the West Coast of the U.S. It especially didn't help that CBS carried the Winter Olympics that year. As a result, the thirteen episodes that were supposed to make up the show’s first season never ran continuously. Kids might tune in one week and catch an episode, but when they tuned at the same time next week all they found was sports coverage. Children have short memories, so a consistent schedule is needed to build a young audience. A CBS spokeswoman acknowledged this problem in a Los Angeles Times review of the show: “It’s preempted a lot,” she said.

CBS also didn’t go out of the way to advertise Cadillacs & Dinosaurs. But in fairness to the network, the tie-in toy line apparently wasn’t released until after the show was canceled, so there was little to generate demand among kids for more adventures. Only a single commercial was produced for the toys. (Warning: Poor sound quality.)



Cadillacs & Dinosaurs did get a pretty fun beat ‘em up arcade game, but as far as I know it was never ported to consoles. Instead kids had to content themselves with Cadillacs & Dinosaurs: The Second Cataclysm on the Sega CD. The game had great full-motion video animation but its gameplay was boring and repetitive.

So, a bad time slot, a lack of commitment on part of the network, and series of missteps in releasing tie-in toys and games. Also factor in Cadillacs & Dinosaurs was a show behind its time, airing in an era when you needed to either feature children as your main stars or bring a level of maturity to the writing that most kids’ programming had previously lacked. As I said at the beginning of this essay, the show never had a chance.

Criticisms aside, I still enjoy the hell out of Cadillacs & Dinosaurs. You can watch the entire series on YouTube or purchase all episodes for $15 on Amazon. (At least in the U.S. I’m not sure about the show’s availability in other countries.)  I suggest trying a couple episodes before making a commitment to watching all 13. The show definitely isn’t for everyone. As for myself, I admit nostalgia fuels part of my love for the series. Another factor is that I’m fascinated by the world Schultz created in the comics, and seeing it brought to life through animation—even in kid-friendly form—fills me with joy. Yes, I would love to someday get an adaptation that is closer in tone to the comics, but for now Cadillacs & Dinosaurs is a perfectly acceptable substitute.

Anyway, if you want to know more about the cartoon, YouTube blogger AdvertisingNuts has a video explaining the differences between the show and the comics:

More essays

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Voracious by Action Lab Entertainment (2015 onward)

Cover blurb

Haunted by the death of his sister, NYC Chef Nate Willner has lost his desire to cook. Forced to move back to his tiny hometown in Utah, Nate’s life is quickly becoming a dead end. But when he unexpectedly inherits a time travel suit that takes him to the age of dinosaurs, Nate’s passion for cooking is reignited! With a little help from his knife-wielding Grandmother Maribel, and friends Starlee and Captain Jim, Nate opens a restaurant that secretly serves dinosaur meat. Can he survive long enough to make it a success and turn his life around?

My thoughts

Most works of fiction bringing together dinosaurs and people usually have the former eating the latter. Voracious is one of the few examples of a story about people who eat dinosaurs – which, come to think of it, would probably be the more likely result if the two were to meet.

Voracious is a comic book series written by Markisan Nazo with art by Jason Muhr. It is published by Action Lab Entertainment, a small publisher that apparently specializes in offbeat comic titles. As of this post, the series just ended its first four-issue story arc, with the creators promising to launch their second story arc either later this year or early next year. Despite the presence of time travel and dinosaurs, Voracious really isn’t as much sci-fi adventure story as it is television melodrama, focusing on the lives of its attractive young protagonists.

Nate Willner is a former big-city chef of Native American descent who moved back to his hometown in Utah after his sister was killed in a restaurant fire. His life has hit the skids, but luckily he has his elderly grandmother Maribel and his life-long friend Starlee to look after him. He has also inherited $500,000 and a secret lab from his reclusive and recently deceased uncle. During a visit to his new property,  Nate finds a modified diving suit that transports him back to late Cretaceous North America. He is stomping around in the prehistoric past when he is attacked by a Quetzalcoatlus that he promptly kills with a flamethrower, leading to a surprising discovery: Dinosaurs (and pterosaurs) are delicious! Soon afterward, Nate opens a restaurant stocked with meat from dinosaurs he hunts in the Cretaceous. The restaurant is an immediate success, but how long will Nate be able to keep his secret? Can he ever get over his guilt about his sister’s death? Will he reciprocate Starlee’s obvious love for him? And won’t changing the past have consequences for the present?

The neat thing about Voracious is it doesn’t go the obvious route for stories of this type. Most comic book series would have been content with a simpler tale about a time traveler who fights dinosaurs. Nazo and Muhr want to tell a more complex narrative. That is not to say Voracious is high literature. It is soap opera, but it is entertaining soap opera, with likable protagonists and a good sense of humor. My biggest complaint so far is the first four issues are really just the opening chapter of a much larger story rather than a self-contained arc. I’m worried the series will get canceled before the creators have had a chance to finish what they started, given Voracious isn’t the type of tale that normally attracts comic book fans. (No female superheroes in tight spandex outfits or over-the-top violence.)

The art is competent if nothing to write home about. Human characters look a bit stiff, lacking the dynamism of living beings. The same is true of the dinosaur depictions. I get the sense the artist is still perfecting his craft, so it will be interesting to see how the illustrations evolve as the series continues.

Nitpicking aside, Voracious is a comic I plan to continue following. It's quirky and I appreciate that it's trying to do something different. I just hope sales are strong enough to allow the creators to finish the tale they want to tell.

Trivia
  • The first four issues of Voracious will be published as a single volume on August 10. In the meantime, you can purchase them individually online through Comixology.
  • The author’s website is markisan.com while the artist’s website is jasonmuhr.com. Both contain examples of artwork from the series.
  • Voracious isn’t the first comic book about time travelers who harvest dinosaurs for meat. As far as I can tell, that distinction goes to Flesh, which first appeared in the British anthology comic 2000AD in 1977. If the title sounds familiar, that’s because 2000AD also gave us Judge Dredd.
Reviews

Novels Set in Prehistoric Times

and Time-Sweep Novels

For news on the latest reviews, author interviews and additions to this website, see the blog.

Jump to:

Young Adult Novels of Prehistoric Times

Prehistoric Europe
Prehistoric North America
Mysteries: Prehistoric North America
Prehistoric Africa, Polynesia and Elsewhere
Time-Sweep Novels


Jean Auel was not the first novelist to write about life in prehistoric times, but her bestselling Clan of the Cave Bear and its sequels breathed life into a new genre of fiction. Conflicts between Neanderthals and Cro-Magnons or Homo sapiens (our own species) are prominent in many novels set in Europe, while novels set in America feature a wide variety of settings, from the crossing of the Bering Straits during the Ice Age to life in prehistoric Louisiana.

Time-sweep novels like those by James A. Michener and Edward Rutherfurd, which cover many centuries or millennia, are included in this section whether or not they begin in prehistory. Novels in a series are listed in the order they appear in the series.

Jump to series:

Jean Auel's Earth's Children series
Michael and Kathleen O'Neal Gear's First North Americans series
William Sarabande's First Americans series


Prehistoric Europe

Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Jean Auel, The Clan of the Cave Bear (1980), about a Cro-Magnon girl raised by a tribe of Neanderthals; #1 in the Earth's Children series.

Jean Auel, The Valley of Horses (1982), about a Cro-Magnon girl who leaves the tribe of Neanderthals who raised her; #2 in the Earth's Children series.

Jean Auel, The Mammoth Hunters (1985), about a Cro-Magnon woman; #3 in the Earth's Children series.

Jean Auel, The Plains of Passage (1990), about a Cro-Magnon woman; #4 in the Earth's Children series.

Jean Auel, The Shelters of Stone (2002), about a Cro-Magnon woman; #5 in the Earth's Children series.

Jean Auel, The Land of Painted Caves (2011), about a Cro-Magnon woman who settles down with her husband and child in a clan where she studies to become a shaman; #6 and last in the Earth's Children series.


Stephen Baxter, Silverhair (1999; also titled Behemoth), a story about a young female mammoth in prehistoric Siberia and her herd's struggle to survive; #1 in the Behemoth trilogy.

Stephen Baxter, Longtusk (1999), about a bull mammoth's effort to lead his herd to safety on the Asian continent after human hunters arrive; #2 in the Behemoth trilogy.

Stephen Baxter, Icebones (2001), about a cow mammoth who awakens from a thousand-year sleep to find her herd may be too weak to survive on its own; #3 in the Behemoth trilogy.


Bernard Cornwell, Stonehenge (1999), about the building of Stonehenge.

Jim Crace, The Gift of Stones (1988), about a boy from a Stone Age village who explores the world beyond the village and discovers people who know how to make and use bronze.

John R. Dann, Song of the Axe (2001), about a pair of warrior-lovers threatened by invaders near the end of an Ice Age.

John R. Dann, Song of the Earth (2005), about several generations of a family wandering from prehistoric Africa north into the European Continent.

J. S. Dunn, Bending the Boyne (2011), about people of Bronze Age Ireland before the coming of the Celts.

Margaret Elphinstone, The Gathering Night (2009), about a group of Stone Age hunter-gatherers in what is now Scotland, and the unusual decision of a woman to become a shaman after her son dies.

Anthony Giarmo, Sweet Muse of Madness (2012), about the priest of a father-worshipping religion and his young acolyte who travel to a goddess-worshipping farming community on the Plain of Thessaly in Greece at the time of a lustful and bloody seasonal festival; #1 in a planned series; self-published.

David Gibbins, Atlantis (2005), about an archaeologist who discovers the ruins of Atlantis under the waters of the Black Sea; present-day setting.

Rob Godfrey, Year of the Celt: Imbolc (2012), about a settlement in Brigantia in 499 B.C., torn apart after refugees fleeing the northern ice-sheets arrive; self-published.

William Golding, The Inheritors (1955), about two Neanderthals who survive an attack on their group by a band of Homo sapiens. Review

Graham Hancock, Entangled (2010), a fantasy novel about a woman in Stone Age Spain and a teenaged girl from Los Angeles who join forces in a parallel dimension to avert an evil magician's plans to destroy humankind.

Dorothy Hearst, Promise of the Wolves (2008), about a young wolf and her pack around 12,000 B.C., when the changes began that led to the evolution of the domesticated dog; #1 in the Wolf Chronicles series.

Dorothy Hearst, Secrets of the Wolves (2011), about a young wolf around 12,000 B.C. who must find a way for wolves to live in harmony with humans, or face potentially disastrous consequences for the choices she and her pack have made; #2 in the Wolf Chronicles series.

Cecelia Holland, Pillar of the Sky (1985), about the building of Stonehenge.

Eileen Kernaghan, The Sarsen Witch (1989), historical fantasy about the building of Stonehenge.

Björn Kurtén, Dance of the Tiger (1980), about Neanderthals and Cro-Magnons in Ice Age Scandinavia.

Björn Kurtén, Singletusk (1986), about Neanderthals and Cro-Magnons in Ice Age Scandinavia.


Morgan Llywelyn, The Horse Goddess (1982), about a Celtic woman with a special gift for communicating with horses who runs away from her salt mining village (today's Hallstatt, Austria) with a nomadic Scythian chieftain in the eighth century B.C.

Morgan Llywelyn, Silverhand (1995), based on ancient Irish creation legends.

Morgan Llywelyn, Silverlight (1996), based on ancient Irish creation legends; sequel to Silverhand.

Morgan Llywelyn, Bard: the Odyssey of the Irish (1984), about a bard in Celtic Iberia (now Spain) who has a vision of leading his people to the land that will become Ireland.

Morgan Llywelyn, Only the Stones Survive (2016), about the ancient gods and goddesses of Ireland.


Mary Mackey, The Year the Horses Came (1993), about a peaceful, goddess-worshipping culture disturbed by nomads on horseback who worship male gods; #1 in the Earthsong trilogy.

Mary Mackey, The Horses at the Gate (1996), about a priestess of the Dark Mother and her lover struggling to survive when nomads attack their people; #2 in the Earthsong trilogy.

Mary Mackey, The Fires of Spring (1998), about a warrior woman's efforts to rescue the kidnapped son of her queen; #3 in the Earthsong trilogy.


Juilene Osborne-McKnight, Song of Ireland (2006), historical fantasy based on the legends of the Celtic migration to Ireland and their conflicts with the original inhabitants.

Cristi Fernández Narvaiza and Martin Bless, Spirits of the Mothers (2009), a book that alternates nonfiction chapters on archaeological discoveries about Ice Age Europe with fiction chapters about a young woman's trek through Europe at the end of the Ice Age.

J.P. Reedman, Stone Lord (2012), a retelling of the King Arthur legend, set in 1900 B.C., with Stonehenge still in use; self-published.

J.P. Reedman, Moon Lord (2012), a retelling of the King Arthur legend which imagines the fall of Stonehenge; sequel to Stone Lord; self-published.

Kim Stanley Robinson, Shaman (2013), a coming-of-age story about a young shaman in prehistoric Europe. Review at The Guardian

William Sarabande, Wolves of the Dawn (1986), set in Britain at the end of the Stone Age

Brenda Gates Smith, Secrets of the Ancient Goddess, about a woman in prehistoric Turkey whose tribe turns against her when she refuses to sacrifice her baby.

Brenda Gates Smith, Goddess of the Mountain Harvest, about two powerful women competing to become high priestess as warlike horsemen threaten their village; sequel to Secrets of the Ancient Goddess.


Judith Tarr, White Mare's Daughter (1998), about a young priestess in a band of warrior nomads and her journey to a city still ruled by women; #1 in the Epona series.

Judith Tarr, The Shepherd Kings (1999), about an Egyptian pharaoh who seeks to form an alliance with Crete; #2 in the Epona series.

Judith Tarr, Lady of Horses (2000), about the anger of the Horse Goddess when male shamans try to alter history by declaring that a male was the first to ride a horse; #3 in the Epona series.

Judith Tarr, Daughter of Lir (2001), about a prince and a psychic potter's daughter trying to save their people from an invasion by warlike tribes wielding a new weapon; #4 in the Epona series.


Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, Reindeer Moon (1987), about a community of hunter-gatherers in Ice Age Siberia; #1 in the Reindeer Moon series

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, The Animal Wife (1990), about a community of hunter-gatherers in Ice Age Siberia; #2 in the Reindeer Moon series

Lindsay Townsend, Bronze Lightning (2009), historical romance about a woman in Minoan Crete and a man from the area of Stonehenge, set in 1562 B.C.

Harry Turtledove, Beyond the Gap (2007), a fantasy novel about mammoth hunters at the end of the Ice Age; #1 in the Gap series.

Harry Turtledove, The Breath of God (forthcoming in December 2008), a fantasy novel about mammoth hunters at the end of the Ice Age; #2 in the Gap series.

Martin Walker, The Caves of Périgord (2002), about an art historian and the owner of a mysterious painting on a slab of rock; set in the present, the World War II period and approximately 15,000 B.C.

Hebe Weenolsen, The Forbidden Mountain (1983), about the building of Stonehenge.


Joan Wolf, Daughter of the Red Deer (1991), a woman from a matriarchal culture in prehistoric southern France who is kidnapped by men from a patriarchal tribe after most of its women are killed in a disaster; #1 in a series.

Joan Wolf, The Horsemasters (1993), about a young man driven out of his matrilineal tribe in prehistoric Southern France; #2 in a series.

Joan Wolf, The Reindeer Hunters (1994), about a group of warring tribes in prehistoric southern France who make peace in order to resist invaders from the north; #3 in a series.


Prehistoric North America

Click on the title for more information from Powell's Books or another online source, or if you're outside the U.S., try The Book Depository.


Amanda Cockrell, Daughter of the Sky (2005), about a North American woman around 3000 B.C. who has the magical ability to draw pictures; #1 in the Deer Dancers series.

Amanda Cockrell, Wind Caller's Children (2006), about two sisters and their brother around 3000 B.C. who must fend for themselves after their father is blamed for a drought and killed; #2 in the Deer Dancers series.

Amanda Cockrell, The Long Walk (2006), about a woman with a small child who discovers she has the ability to draw pictures; #3 in the Deer Dancers series.


Vince Ford, Scorched Bone (2008), about twins who set out to find a revolutionary new arrowhead they have heard about (today known as the "Clovis Point"); #1 in the Chronicles of Stone trilogy, also published in a single volume as Chronicles of Stone.

Vince Ford, Set in Stone (2008), about twins who contact a northern tribe with the goal of stealing knowledge of a weapon their own tribe wants to help it survive; #2 in the Chronicles of Stone trilogy, also published in a single volume as Chronicles of Stone.

Vince Ford, Tribal Ash (2009), about a man returning to his own tribe with a valuable object, in the hope that they will not reject him for breaking the tribal laws; #3 in the Chronicles of Stone trilogy, also published in a single volume as Chronicles of Stone.


Caleb Fox, Zadayi Red (2009), prehistoric fantasy about a young shaman of the ancient Galayi, ancestors of the Cherokee.

Caleb Fox, Shadows in the Cave (2010), about a boy who is forbidden to use his shape-shifting abilities after his mother is killed while in the form of an owl; sequel to Zadayi Red.


Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Wolf, about the people who crossed the land bridge from Asia to North America and became the first humans to settle the American continent; #1 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Fire, about prehistoric North America; #2 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Earth, about the beginnings of agriculture in North America; #3 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the River, about the Mound Builders of the Mississippi Valley; #4 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Sea (1993), set in North America during the time when the mammoths were disappearing; #5 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Lakes (1994), about the prehistoric people who lived by Niagara Falls; #6 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Lightning (1995), set in prehistoric North America; #7 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Silence (1996), about a girl who flees her village after a dying Anasazi chieftain orders that she be found and killed; #8 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Mist (1997), about the prehistoric people of the Chesapeake Bay area; #9 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Masks (1998), about the Iroquois people; #10 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Owl (2003), about a young man in prehistoric Louisiana who inherits his dead brother's wives; #11 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Raven (2004), about the Pacific Northwest and what the life of "Kennewick Man" may have been like; #12 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Moon (2005), about the Anasazi of Chaco Canyon; #13 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Nightland (2007), about the people of the Great Lakes region as the end of the Ice Age looms, threatening the potential catastrophe of the melting of an ice dam; #14 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Weeping Eye (2008), about a journey to the head of the Mississippi; #15 in the First North Americans series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Thunder (2009), about three travelers crossing Choctaw country and heading into the midst of a violent confrontation involving the mound-building peoples of fourteenth century Mississippi; #16 in the First North Americans series.


Kathleen O’Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, People of the Longhouse (2010), about a brother and sister taken captive by an evil witch when their village is attacked; #1 in the People of the Longhouse series.

Kathleen O’Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, The Dawn Country (2011), about children held captive by an evil witch, and their efforts to free themselves; #2 in the People of the Longhouse series. Review

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, The Broken Land (2012), about a disgraced warrior of the Iroquois whose vision of a great darkness spurs him to band together with his childhood friends to resist a powerful enemy; #3 in the People of the Longhouse series.


Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, Coming of the Storm (2010), about native Americans in Florida in 1539 when explorer Hernando De Soto first arrives; #1 in the Contact series.

W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O’Neal Gear, Fire the Sky (2011), about an exiled Florida Indian and his wife who lead a small band against Hernando De Soto's brutal party of explorers; #2 in the Contact series.

W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O’Neal Gear, A Searing Wind (2012), about an exiled Florida Indian and his wife who must walk into the camp of their enemy, Hernando De Soto, in order to save their people; #3 in the Contact series.


Kathleen O'Neal Gear, It Sleeps in Me, a tale of the occult about a High Chieftess; #1 in the Black Falcon series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear, It Wakes in Me, a tale of the occult about a High Chieftess; #2 in the Black Falcon series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear, It Dreams in Me, a tale of the occult about a High Chieftess; #3 in the Black Falcon series.


Sue Harrison, Mother Earth, Father Sky, about a young woman on the northwest coast of America during the Ice Age who sets out on a sea voyage after her tribe is massacred; #1 in the Ivory Carver trilogy.

Sue Harrison, My Sister the Moon, about a young Ice Age woman abused by her tribe who struggles for love and her children's future; #2 in the Ivory Carver trilogy.

Sue Harrison, Brother Wind, about a North American woman during the Ice Age; #3 in the Ivory Carver trilogy.

Sue Harrison, Song of the River, about a boy in prehistoric Alaska who was abandoned to die at birth and the vengeful woman who finds and raises him; #1 in the Storyteller series.

Sue Harrison, Cry of the Wind, about a storyteller in prehistoric Alaska, his vengeful mother, and the woman he loves who is married to another man; #2 in the Storyteller series.

Sue Harrison, Call Down the Stars (2001), about two storytellers in prehistoric Alaska who vie to tell the best story; #3 in the Storyteller series.


Kathleen King, Cricket Sings: A Novel Of Pre-Columbian Cahokia (1983), about a woman of the Cahokia people in what is now Illinois.


Ardath Mayhar, People of the Mesa, about a young Anasazi man; #1 in the Mesa series.

Ardath Mayhar, Island in the Lake, about a woman of the Mound Builders in what is now East Texas and a man who escaped an Aztec sacrifice as a child; #2 in the Mesa series.

Ardath Mayhar, Towers of the Earth, about a woman who leads her people on a dangerous trip westward after drought destroys their homeland; #3 in the Mesa series.


Gary McCarthy, Mesa Verde Thunder (2011; originally published 1997 as Mesa Verde), about the cliff-dwelling people of Mesa Verde.

Lynn Armistead McKee, Daughter of the Fifth Moon, about an orphaned girl who lands on a prehistoric Caribbean island and the man who protects her.

Anne Montgomery, The Magician (2013), about a present-day reporter researching an archaeological site and a magician living in the eleventh century in what is now Arizona.

Charlotte Prentiss, The Island Tribe, about a rebellious chieftain's daughter whose tribe casts her out.

Charlotte Prentiss, The Ocean Tribe, about a woman and her husband who turn away from warfare and attempt to form a peaceful new tribe.

Cha Rnacircle, Right of Way (2012), about North Americans of 20,000 years ago who try to start a trading route; #1 in the Voice of the Ancients series; self-published.

Cha Rnacircle, Against All Odds (2012), about a healer in the far north who accidentally crosses into North America; #2 in the Voice of the Ancients series; self-published.

Judith Redman Robbins, Coyote Woman, a coming-of-age story about an Anasazi girl in prehistoric Chaco Canyon; #1 in the Anasazi trilogy.

Judith Redman Robbins, Sun Priestess, about a prehistoric Anasazi woman who returns home to become a priestess; #2 in the Anasazi trilogy.

Judith Redman Robbins, Moon Fire, about a prehistoric Anasazi woman with a gift for communicating with animals; #3 in the Anasazi trilogy.

Patricia Rowe, Keepers of the Misty Time, about about the woman who leads a migratory tribe in the Columbia River area 9,000 years in the past.

Patricia Rowe, Children of the Dawn, about a woman in prehistoric America; sequel to Keepers of the Misty Time.

Sharman Apt Russell, The Last Matriarch, about a prehistoric woman who lived through the disastrous time when the mammoths and other large land animals of North America were wiped out.


William Sarabande, Beyond the Sea of Ice (1987), about an Ice Age hunter who loses his wife and child in an attack by a killer mammoth, then leads the survivors eastward to a new country; #1 in the First Americans series

William Sarabande, Corridor of Storms (1988), about a man and his family who lead their people across the tundra to a winter camp for a mammoth hunt, where they encounter a magician intent on their destruction; #2 in the First Americans series.

William Sarabande, Forbidden Land (1989), about a headman who must journey with his family to a new land after his tribe turns against him; #3 in the First Americans series.

William Sarabande, Walkers of the Wind (1990), about an Ice Age hunter leading a group of his people to the forbidden "home of the wind;" #4 in the First Americans series.

William Sarabande, The Sacred Stones (1991), about a young shaman trying to prevent the destruction of the last mammoths during the waning of the Ice Age; #5 in the First Americans series.

William Sarabande, Thunder in the Sky (1992), about a young shaman leading his people along a trail made by a white mammoth, which he believes will lead them to a place of safety and plenty; #6 in the First Americans series.

William Sarabande, The Edge of the World (1993), about a shaman driven by a vision to break a taboo; #7 in the First Americans series.

William Sarabande, Shadow of the Watching Star (1995), about a shaman who leaves his people to go on a lone quest to save the last surviving mammoths; #8 in the First Americans series.

William Sarabande, Face of the Rising Sun (1996), about the end of the Ice Age; #9 in the First Americans series

William Sarabande, Time Beyond Beginning (1998), about the last mammoth and a shaman who goads his people to kill it at the close of the Ice Age; #10 in the First Americans series.

William Sarabande, Spirit Moon (2000), about a headman who sets out with his people on a journey to the Great River of the White Whales amid predictions of doom and the risk that a broken truce could lead to warfare; #11 in the First Americans series.


Linda Lay Shuler, She Who Remembers, about a woman of the Anasazi people in the thirteenth century American Southwest; #1 in the She Who Remembers trilogy.

Linda Lay Shuler, Voice of the Eagle, about a woman of the Anasazi people in the thirteenth century American Southwest; #2 in the She Who Remembers trilogy.

Linda Lay Shuler, Let the Drum Speak, about a woman of the Anasazi people in the thirteenth century American Southwest; #3 in the She Who Remembers trilogy.

Penina Keen Spinka, Picture Maker (2002), about a woman in fourteenth century North America who draws pictures that foretell the future, and her migrations northward and across the sea to Greenland.


Barbara Wood, Woman of a Thousand Secrets, about a woman from a Pacific island who migrates to the land of the Maya.

Barbara Wood, Daughter of the Sun, a novel about an Anasazi woman potter captured by Toltec raiders, which offers a possible answer to the mystery of why the Anasazi abandoned Chaco Canyon.

Barbara Wood, Sacred Ground, about an archaeologist who, after an earthquake in California, discovers a cave inhabited 2000 years before, and about the woman whose bones she found in the cave.


Mysteries: Prehistoric North America

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Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, The Visitant (1999), the boundaries between past and present thin as an archaeologist studies an ancient mass grave, while a killer stalks victims in both times; #1 in the Anasazi Mysteries series.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, The Summoning God (2000), the boundaries between past and present thin as an archaeologist studies the ancient bones of two adults and thirty-three children; #2 in the Anasazi Mysteries series

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, Bone Walker (2001), a pair of archaeologists are faced with murder, ancient and modern; #3 in the Anasazi Mysteries series


Prehistoric Africa, Polynesia and Elsewhere

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Debra Austin, Daughter of Kura (2009), about a young Homo erectus woman in a matriarchal society in prehistoric Africa who is cast out after challenging her mother's dangerous new mate. Review or Author Interview

Steven Barnes, Great Sky Woman (2006), about a boy and girl in a prehistoric African tribe who climb Mount Kilimanjaro to seek help from Father Sky after the tribe is attacked by invaders.

Steven Barnes, Shadow Valley (2009), about a young man and woman in a prehistoric African tribe who survive an eruption of Mount Kilimanjaro and lead a search for a new home for the tribe; sequel to Great Sky Woman.


Clare Coleman, Daughter of the Reef (1992), about a Polynesian chief's daughter who must learn to live in a new land among unfriendly people after her canoe is wrecked on the shore of Tahiti; #1 in the Ancient Tahiti series.

Clare Coleman, Sister of the Sun (1993), about a Polynesian chief's daughter who returns to her home island after years on Tahiti, to find unwelcome changes; #2 in the Ancient Tahiti series.

Clare Coleman, Child of the Dawn (1994), about a woman who returns to Tahiti, to find that war has broken out in her absence and forced her lover into hiding; #3 in the Ancient Tahiti series.


Vasant Davé, Trade Winds to Meluhha (2012), about a Babylonian stable boy who must flee his home in 2138 BC after being accused of murder, and travels to the Indus Valley; self-published.


Time-Sweep Novels

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Julian Barnes, A History of the World in 10½ Chapters (1989), a collection of humorous stories, beginning with a pair of talking woodworms from Noah's Ark, which suggests that history is imposed on the past by historians.

Ann Brashares, My Name is Memory (2010), a love story about two high school seniors and their past lives beginning in the sixth century when he first fell in love with her, as he tries to connect with her in the present; #1 in a planned trilogy.

Alex Haley, Roots (1976), about an African man captured by slavers in 1767 and brought to America, and his descendants into the twentieth century; based on the author's research of his own family history.

Mick Jackson, The Bears of England (2009), a blend of history, fantasy and folk tale about "bears in chains, the circus bears of Bristol, the Victorian sewer bears and the spirit bears of the early years."

Norah Lofts, A Wayside Tavern (1980), about the people who operate a tavern in Britain from the end of Roman times into the twentieth century.

The Medieval Murderers, The Sacred Stone (2010), five linked mystery stories by authors Bernard Knight, Michael Jecks, Susanna Gregory, Ian Morson and Philip Gooden, about the violent events surrounding an ill-omened "sky-stone," from its discovery in Greenland in 1067 through the next six centuries.


James A. Michener, Hawaii (1959), about the Hawaiian Islands from the time they were first settled by Polynesians from Bora Bora into the 1950s.

James A. Michener, The Source (1965), about the land that is now Israel from prehistoric to modern times.

James A. Michener, Centennial (1974), about the people who lived in the location of the fictional town of Centennial, Colorado, from prehistoric to modern times.

James A. Michener, Chesapeake (1978), about the people who lived in the area of Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, from the days of the Indian tribes before European settlement into modern times.

James A. Michener, The Covenant (1980), about South Africa from prehistoric times into the present, especially focusing on the Afrikaners.

James A. Michener, Poland (1983), about Poland from medieval to modern times.

James A. Michener, Texas (1985), about Texas from the time of the earliest Spanish explorers to modern times.

James A. Michener, Alaska (1988), about Alaska from prehistoric to modern times.

James A. Michener, Caribbean (1989), about the Caribbean Islands from the invasion of the Caribs in prehistory into modern times.

James A. Michener, Mexico (1992), about the history of Mexican bullfighting and its antecedents from prehistoric to modern times.


Edward Rutherfurd, Sarum: The Novel of England (1987), about the area in which Stonehenge and Salisbury Cathedral were built, from the end of the last Ice Age into modern times.

Edward Rutherfurd, Russka: The Novel of Russia (1991), about the people of Russia from its early history into modern times.

Edward Rutherfurd, London (1996), about the people living in the area where London would be built from the time of Julius Caesar's first invasion of Britain into modern times.

Edward Rutherfurd, The Forest (2000), about the people of England's New Forest from the time of the Norman Conquest into modern times.

Edward Rutherfurd, The Princes of Ireland: The Dublin Saga (2004; titled Dublin: Foundation in the U.K.), about Ireland from prehistoric times to the time of England's Henry VIII and the only Irish attempt to invade England.

Edward Rutherfurd, The Rebels of Ireland: The Dublin Saga (2006; titled Ireland: Awakening in the U.K.), about Ireland from the sixteenth century into the twentieth; sequel to The Princes of Ireland.

Edward Rutherfurd, New York (2009), about New York City from its founding to the present day. Review or Author Interview

Edward Rutherfurd, Paris (2013), about the city of Paris from its founding in Roman times into the twentieth century.


Barbara Wood, The Blessing Stone (2003), about the people throughout history whose lives were affected by a beautiful blue crystal that fell to earth in a meteorite and was discovered 100,000 years ago by a girl on an African plain.

Patricia Wright, I Am England (1987), about the people who lived in a forest in Sussex from pagan times into the late sixteenth century.

Patricia Wright, That Near and Distant Place (1988), about the people who lived in a forest in Sussex from the late sixteenth century into the twentieth, narrated by a pilot wounded in World War II; sequel to I Am England.


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